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 Post subject: Training a horse
PostPosted: Wed May 05, 2010 7:47 am 
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Posts: 1370
So I have a client with a horse that's been deemed "Rank" and therefore in need of either retirement or the bullet.

Turns out the horse is hurting and once the pain is removed, horse is fine and happy. Sweet dispostition, trained well, happy.

People who I won't name think the answer to the owner's fear is to Ace (a drug used to sedate horses) the horse so owner can ride.
I volunteered to Ace the owner.

The other "Trainer's" option of course, is to take a horse out and 'lather' him for 1-2 hours 3-5 times per week for two weeks, then return horse to owner and call it good. (True, an exhausted horse won't give as much trouble if he is struggling to breathe and a drugged horse simply can't move fast enough.)

Why are these practices STILL in existence?
Why is it ok to say you are a trainer, then use drugs and the cruel practice of running them down to make them comply?
Why do 'Trainers' resort to drugs and force and still consider themselves successful??
Why are these things ok?

And, Why would ANYONE think I'd even consider doing that????

Just want it known far and wide here that I have never and will never drug a horse to get what I want from him. And never is 'Lathering' them okay as a means to call them 'Trained'. A happy horse that is treated with respect and fairness will always get what you want, you don't need to do the above things to 'Train' a horse. Trust developes willingness.


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PostPosted: Mon May 10, 2010 1:03 pm 
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Joined: Fri May 07, 2010 3:00 pm
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Ok so first weekend out this year. yay! Although my parts are a little sore. I have a cute little mare but we have a problem. She won't go faster than a walk. I rode her in 2 different saddles. One a western saddle felt too heavy for her. The next day I tried an endurance saddle that is much lighter. She would trot a little but only if I clicked/clucked whatever to her. When I bumped her with my leg she tried to bite my foot. She travels with her head down low past vertical. So seems to me a pain issue because when she's free running around back, her head is up, her eyes are bright and she can move just fine. What I'm thinking here is that I have pain. Question is: Is it her back or her feet. If it's her back is it from a bad saddle fit, a chiropractic issue or am I too fat? So here's my thought. I'm going to ride her with a bareback pad to eliminate the saddle fit question and then go from there. Considering how much I love this little mare, liposuction is not out of the question. Anyway, any other ideas?


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 Post subject: Training a horse
PostPosted: Mon May 10, 2010 7:12 pm 
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Joined: Sat Apr 10, 2010 9:58 am
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Knowing the little honey, I'd say she is still afraid of the pain that she used to have if not feeling it still. She remembers how it was before the surgery and may be thinking that's all there is to being ridden. Try the treeless and see if you like it. Sad thing is, the one you need and the one I need is not for sale anymore....we need it because of the short backs our short horses have.

I can come over this week after work--let me know when.


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 Post subject: Re: Training a horse
PostPosted: Mon May 10, 2010 8:37 pm 
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Joined: Fri May 07, 2010 3:00 pm
Posts: 2
I didn't think about her having memories. With the snow coming it could be hard to try her with the bareback pad this week. I'm going to the clinic Saturday but maybe I can't ride her in it since saddles are required. but still thinking liposuction would help us both.


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 Post subject: Training a horse
PostPosted: Tue May 11, 2010 7:40 am 
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Joined: Sat Apr 10, 2010 9:58 am
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Heck, I don't care if you have a saddle! Only the ACTHA ride requires a saddle. Plus, I have the treeless you can use. Mares have longer backs than geldings so maybe the bigger one will fit her. I think we should try. What time will you be home tonight? Come by Bridlewood and get it or I'll bring it over if I still have my lesson at 6. If so, I get done around 7. Call me


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 Post subject: Training a horse
PostPosted: Thu Aug 04, 2011 2:24 pm 
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Joined: Sat Jul 16, 2011 4:58 pm
Posts: 99
Location: Holly, Michigan
LopingAlong wrote:
So I have a client with a horse that's been deemed "Rank" and therefore in need of either retirement or the bullet.

Turns out the horse is hurting and once the pain is removed, horse is fine and happy. Sweet dispostition, trained well, happy.

People who I won't name think the answer to the owner's fear is to Ace (a drug used to sedate horses) the horse so owner can ride.
I volunteered to Ace the owner.

The other "Trainer's" option of course, is to take a horse out and 'lather' him for 1-2 hours 3-5 times per week for two weeks, then return horse to owner and call it good. (True, an exhausted horse won't give as much trouble if he is struggling to breathe and a drugged horse simply can't move fast enough.)

Why are these practices STILL in existence?
Why is it ok to say you are a trainer, then use drugs and the cruel practice of running them down to make them comply?
Why do 'Trainers' resort to drugs and force and still consider themselves successful??
Why are these things ok?

And, Why would ANYONE think I'd even consider doing that????

Just want it known far and wide here that I have never and will never drug a horse to get what I want from him. And never is 'Lathering' them okay as a means to call them 'Trained'. A happy horse that is treated with respect and fairness will always get what you want, you don't need to do the above things to 'Train' a horse. Trust developes willingness.



owning 3- horse that I rescued from bad situations You are 100% right in my book!

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Never Say Never


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